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Chapter 3. Assessing the Elementary School–Age Child

Myra M. Kamran, M.D.; Colleen Cicchetti, Ph.D.
DOI: 10.1176/appi.books.9781585623921.451472

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Excerpt

In the typical mental health setting, most presenting patients fall in the age range of "middle childhood," ages 6–12 years (Farmer et al. 2003). Clinicians evaluating these patients and their families should be familiar with expected childhood developmental progression and the more common developmental "deviations" or difficulties and psychopathology in middle childhood.

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Table Reference Number
TABLE 3–1. Key procedural information to cover in the first evaluation session
Table Reference Number
Appendix 3–1. Detailed outline for the psychiatric assessment of the school-age child
Table Reference Number
Appendix 3–2. Child mental status examination

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